FOR THE LOVE OF INCENSE AND THE12 STAGES OF THE MAKING OF BAIEIDO INCENSE

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I love Japanese incense and in particular the incense that Baieido make.My first introduction to Baieido was with their Kobunboku short sticks. I bought it as it had great reviews and it didn’t cost to much which suited . When I burnt it ,it delivered more than I was expecting. I was captivated with it’s sweet spicy earthy scent.I never had experienced an incense like this . This first experience with Baieido incense has lead me to be a  great fan of their incense ranges.Divine Incense & Aromatics 007

The considered process of making Baieido incense means it delivers an incense that is both beautiful,elegant and manages to be both complex and subtle at the same time.

http://olfactoryrescueservice.wordpress.com/ is possibly one the best informative incense blogs there is. They say  about Baieidos’ Kobunboku range, ‘These are not incenses for stuffy noses and short attention spans, they reveal themselves more in introspective mode and as such are perfect fits for meditation, and are categorized both as incenses that are traditional and used for meditation.’

Baieido have a 12 stage process to making their incense ,which is:

1. An inspection of  natural perfume takes place, to ensure the quality
2. The aloes and sandalwoods are milled and crushed together into a powder form.
3. The ingredients are now all blended together and made to tradition recipes.
4. The mixed materials are put through a sieve to remove any impurities.
5. The materials are kneaded to form a clay-like substance, called tama.008
6. The tama is pressed to form stick shapes and are then laid on a tray and cut to a set length.
7. The incense sticks are dried out and any that aren’t straight are removed.
8. The sticks of incense are cut into different lengths.
9. The sticks are dried for several days in summer and ten days in winter.
10. The incense sticks are adjusted with a board, to help prevent them becoming bent.
11. Each individual incense stick is carefully inspected, then bound together with a fixed weight.
12. The sticks are checked again, before being packed up.

The six grades of Jinko (Aloeswood, Agarwood).

The Six grades of Jinko (Aloeswood, Agarwood)

In Japan Aloeswood is the most prized fragrant wood incense of all. The amazing quality of its incense is only just being discovered in the West.

In Japan, valuable kimonos were scented with smoke from burning Aloeswood. This is the traditional wood for the incense ceremony of Kodo, and in Japan it is purchased in six different qualities. The best wood, Kyara, is differentiated by colour and quality.

Aloeswood, along with santal and clove, is sacred to the Buddhist religion. The living and dead tree is attacked by a fungus, and over time, preferably centuries, nature provides an incense material worth more than its weight in gold.

Aloeswood is a psychoactive substance, and is used in oriental medicines for nervous disorders, colic and as a heart tonic.

The six grades of Jinko are as follows:-

Kyara (The Aristocrat)                                                                                     the-lady-maisumi-of-daimonji-ya-md
Connoisseurs regard this as top-grade material. It is divided according to quality, based on colour (green, black, purple and dark brown-grey).

Rakoku (The Samurai)the-actor-band-mitsugor-ii-md

Reminiscent of the warrior, the aroma of Rakoku is considered relatively pungent and bitter. This type originally hailed from Thailand.

Sasora (The Monk)

Of priestly demeanor, the aroma is considered delicate, cool and sour. Sasora may have originated from the western shores of India, around Goa.

 

Sumotara (The Servant disguised as a noble)

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The aroma has the makings of Kyara, but with the lack of subtlety in-depth. It is an impersonator, hence the name. Described as a sour smell, Sumotara has a somewhat distasteful demeanor. Sumotara originally came from the island of Sumatra in the east Indian archipelago.

Manaka (The fickle one of changing moods)

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Delicate and ever-changing, the tastes of sweet, sour bitter, hot and salty are not easily detectable, and if they are it is a fleeting impression. Manaka hailed from the strait of Malacca between Indonesia and Malaya.

 

Manaban ( The coarse peasant)

Sweet. unrefined and coarse, with a grittiness that distinguishes it from high quality material. Manaban came from the Malabar coast of southern India.

 

syukohkoku                 white cloud

 

Namaste

Mike & Nikki

Thank you to The library of Congress for the images

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Follow your nose and win

 

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Competition

Entre our competition and win our basket of fragrant goodies, which is:

  • Massage candles worth £12.50
  • Shoyeido white Cloud Incense worth £13.75
  • Baieido Wild flowers worth £9.97
  • Handcrafted incense holder worth £7.00
  • Naturally scented soy wax candle worth £12.00

Prize worth over £50.00

Simply name the two brand of Japanese incense we have on our online store at divine-incense.com and go to our competition page or just click on the above image to go to the page.

We will put all answers in a hat and pull out the winner.

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All answers must be sent by Friday November 14th and the winner will be notified by Tuesday 18th November.

Good Luck

Mike & Nikki

The journey of incense Shoyeido-Nijo (Avenue of the Villa Nijo)

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First Steps

I started my journey with Nijo very much at a head level but with plenty of curiosity. I was wondering what would be the difference between coils and stick incense and thinking was the incense worth the price. Nijo gives you ten coils of incense and comes with a porcelain incense holder for the price of £26.75 ,which I would consider this the top of my budget for what I would pay for incense. Each coil burns between 2 and 2 1/2hrs. First steps   I lit Nijo and sat back and waited to see what I would sense. At first there were gentle waves of flora notes fill the air, it was pleasing like smelling the aroma of freshly cut flowers in the space. At this point I wanted more (it’s worth noting I can be impatient at times). I need not worry as later the incense  gave me so much more than I was expecting. Image

The middle

As time passed the intensity of the fragrance grew and it reveled definite notes of sandalwood along with a greater concentration of the flora notes. I felt as though the incense was taking me to a fragrant temple made up of exotic woods and flowers which filled me full of delight and joy as each moment  different elements of essence showed itself. During the experience I noticed I stopped trying to identify each ingredient and just sat back to connect with the experience.

Returning home

Once the incense had been burnt the room was left with traces of the aroma from the incense which was still to be felt the next morning. I now realize what a beautiful and fascinating incense this is for me. I understood that Nijo is a special incense, to be lit only when there is time to fully enjoy it or for special occasions and not a daily incense. I am left looking forward to my next adventure with Nijo and I will choose a time when I can fully appreciate it. Dare I say it I think this incense is worth every penny and I now fully appreciate the mastery of ingredients that Shoyeido have shown in producing such a beautiful incense.

Namaste Nikki Image

Quick Facts About Agarwood Oil

You always give such great information about Agarwood on your blog.Thank you so much for sharing.
Nikki

Vietnam Agarwood

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Quick Facts About Agarwood Oil

  1. Agarwood is the most rare and precious wood on the planet, prized for its rich, wonderful and healing fragrance.
  2. Agarwood has also been used in nearly every religious tradition around the world and revered for thousands of years by many cultures as the most treasured incense ingredient.
  3. Agarwoods ability to invoke a deep sense of relaxation makes it extremely useful in any aromatherapy session, but is especially effective where anxiety and depression are present.

Agarwood Aquilaria malaccensis in herbal uses 

Is Agarwood Aquilaria malaccensis a herb? How is it application?

Internally for digestive and bronchial complaints, fevers, and rheumatism (bark, wood). Because of its astringent nature, the powdered wood of the aloes tree provide an effective skin tonic and is recommended by Ayurvedic physicians as an application for restoring pigment in leucoderma.

Powdered aloeswood provides an antiseptic so gentle it is used for ear…

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Uplifting st Clements

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Uplifting st Clements

Create and make!
We have started to make my own candles for divine incense & aromatic as we wanted to develop a range of candles which not only looked different but smelt heavenly. So after many attempts (and I mean many) we have developed the first in our new range of rice pattern tea cup candles which is the St Clements.

Natural
The candles are made using soy wax and aromatherapy oils which I have blend to give a subtle but uplifting scent to the candles. The aromatherapy oils I have used are: Orange,Lemongrass,Citronella, Lemon Eucalyptus and to bring a bit of fun to the party Tangerine . As I am a aromatherapist I wanted the St Clements candle to be scented with oils which have uplifting qualities, which I think the citrus oils always deliver on.

Neat and sweet
Each candle is in it own ceramic rice  pattern tea cup and comes with its own stylish bamboo case which makes it an idea gift